Eligibility for Unemployment in North Carolina

Learning about eligibility for unemployment benefits is the first step in understanding if a potential recipient qualifies for the government program. Unemployment Insurance was originally created to aid workers who were let go from their jobs while they attempted to find new jobs. However, qualifications for unemployment are strict, because of the nature and the demand of the unemployment insurance program. For more information on how to qualify for unemployment in North Carolina, review the following topics:

  • What are the requirements to get unemployment in North Carolina?
  • How to Qualify for Unemployment in North Carolina
  • How to Keep Eligibility for Unemployment in North Carolina

What are the requirements to get unemployment in North Carolina?

Qualifications for unemployment benefits vary, depending on the state’s specific program. Each state will set its own eligibility for EDD and because of that, who qualifies for unemployment will change from one state to the next. In the state of North Carolina, the Division of Employment Security (DES) issues all requirements for how to qualify for unemployment benefits. NC unemployment insurance eligibility is contingent upon three main categories: the reason a worker became unemployed, base period wages and work availability. Any worker who wishes to meet unemployment insurance eligibility standards must comply by all three category requirements.

How to Qualify for Unemployment

The three main qualifications for unemployment in North Carolina have very specific details that will reveal if a worker is eligible to apply for unemployment benefits or not. The Department of Employment Security will first look at the reason a worker became unemployed. If a worker was fired due to circumstances beyond his or her control, he or she will be one step closer to satisfying the eligibility for EDD benefit requirements. Unemployment insurance eligibility in NC does not apply to those workers who were fired due to misconduct in the workplace. To ensure that the statements provided by workers are legitimate, the Division of Employment Security will contact a worker’s previous boss to verify that a worker did not quit of his or her own volition, and that the reason for termination was valid enough to satisfy unemployment insurance eligibility requirements. To learn more about how to distinguish if termination from work is considered justified by NC unemployment standards, download our guide.

The second major qualification for unemployment concerns base period wages. A base period is defined as all of the wages earned within a one-year period. A base period is calculated through recent work history, which must be provided to determine eligibility for unemployment benefits. In the state of North Carolina, a base period will have five calendar quarters in it, and the actual base period wages are calculated from the first four calendar quarters prior to an unemployment claim being filed. In order to meet qualifications for unemployment, a worker must have wages earned in any two quarters of the calculated base period and must have earned a specific amount of money in the third or fourth quarters of the calculated base period.

The final qualification for unemployment focuses on availability to work. Unemployment insurance benefits are not unlimited. If eligibility for unemployment in North Carolina is met, a worker will have a maximum of 20 weeks of benefits, and that is only if he or she continues to prove that an effort is being made to find new employment. Eligibility for EDD can be revoked if a worker does not show ample effort in finding a new position that is equivalent to his or her previous job. While a worker continues to live off of unemployment benefits, he or she must keep a work log of the job hunt. Download our free guide to review what the job search log must contain. If a worker is offered a positon comparable to his or her previous position, he or she is obligated to accept it, or eligibility for unemployment in North Carolina will be revoked.

How to Keep Eligibility for Unemployment in North Carolina

It is very easy to lose eligibility for unemployment in North Carolina. The Department of Employment Security is strict about who continues to receive unemployment benefits and who does not, because the need for unemployment benefits has been on the rise. Any worker who does not submit a weekly job report to the division will not be able to keep eligibility for unemployment benefits. Additionally, any workers who receive unemployment benefits for the first time are required to undergo in-person interviews in order to continue to receive benefits. A worker will lose eligibility for EDD if it turns out that any information provided on either the work search log or the unemployment application is false.


What Is Unemployment Insurance in North Carolina?

Eligible unemployed residents in North Carolina can receive financial assistance benefits from the government. These unemployment benefits last for months and can provide a much-needed boost while members of the program pursue work. In any case, in order to enroll in this program, applicants must learn about the acceptable application procedures and the program’s eligibility criteria. Find out everything you need to know about NC unemployment insurance here.


Who Is Eligible for North Carolina Unemployment Benefits?

In order to receive unemployment insurance (UI) or compensation in the state of North Carolina, you need to meet a few qualifications. First of all, you must have lost your job due to no fault of your own. Additionally, you will need to maintain proof of your job search while receiving UI benefits. Learn more about unemployment eligibility by downloading our guide.